Curriculum Filter Results

Patterns In Nature

Students will learn the concept of a pattern. Students will be able to identify, continue and create patterns. Students will learn to recognize patterns in nature.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.


Published by rfeldbrugge | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Sum of the Rivers

Students will see maps of Lake Superior and the St. Louis River to compare the sizes. Students will then each draw a portion of either the St. Louis River or a river near their school that flows into the St. Louis River or Lake Superior. They will make connections that every part of the river can impact the health of the rest of the river and of Lake Superior.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.
8. The Great Lakes are socially, economically, and environmentally significant to the region, the nation and the planet.


Published by Ariel Johnson | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Construct a Cell

Students will gather items they can find in nature to put as parts in a cell. The catch is that students must explain why that item represents the cell organelle by using metaphors, similes, or other explanations. Prerequisite: Students must have a firm understanding of cell parts and functions. This lesson would be great as a unit wrap-up lesson. An example would be that an acorn could represent a vesicle because it transports seeds to other places in a protective casing like a vesicle transports proteins in a cell.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.


Published by Ariel Johnson | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Online Resources for Data, Kits, Information and More!

The curriculum attached is actually a list of websites you can find useful for you and your students. Some of the websites will give you access to data that you can give to your students, other websites (like the WI DNR EEK!! website) provides information that your students can use (and is age appropriate for elementary/middle school). Other websites provide great kits or other resources.

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Topics: , , , , , , , , ,

Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.
8. The Great Lakes are socially, economically, and environmentally significant to the region, the nation and the planet.


Published by Ariel Johnson | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Visual Aid: Trees that Keep their Leaves

This is a one-pager, student sheet with quality images of cedar, balsam fir, red pine, spruce, and white pine needles for field identification and extension activities. Have students make a display by gathering specimens, researching, or for smaller students, simply writing the names of the trees by the correct images. Regardless, GO OUTSIDE with your students and collect some samples of these trees for your classroom. Tell the Ojibwe oral story that explains this phenomenon.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.


Published by jamiezak | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Plants and their Seeds

In this lesson, students do a field study on the great variety of seeds on their school grounds. They use the "wool sock" collection method, hand lenses, and microscopes. The main line of inquiry is "How are seeds dispersed?", but opportunities abound for lesson extension.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.


Published by jamiezak | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Great Lakes Aquarium – Research Prompts

The attachments below are a "student copy" and a "teacher copy" of a guide to each exhibit at the Great Lakes Aquarium in Duluth, MN. One purpose of this resource is as a school research project kick-off for students and their teacher. Another is developing a teaching unit, using student inquiry as your guide. This resource may also be used for digging in deeper to the exhibits through teacher-guided discussion, partner-group discussion, or individual reflection.

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Subject Areas: , ,
Grade Levels: , ,
Topics: , , , , , , ,

Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.
8. The Great Lakes are socially, economically, and environmentally significant to the region, the nation and the planet.


Published by jamiezak | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Question of the day for Early Childhood-Spring

Spring has arrived! Here are some questions to get the discussion going about what is happening right outside the classroom!

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Subject Areas: , ,
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Topics: , , , ,

Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.


Published by jane | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Question of the Day for Early Childhood -Winter

Continue the classroom discussions about Phenology and the Lake Superior Watershed with these questions relating to Winter

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Details

Subject Areas: , ,
Grade Levels:
Topics: , , , , ,

Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.


Published by jane | No comments | View curriculum with discussion