Curriculum Filter Results

1824 Map of the St. Louis River Estuary

This is a copy of the first map ever drawn of the St. Louis River Estuary. It was drawn by Admiral Henry Bayfield in 1824. Pay close attention to the inscription on the map.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.

Bathymetry of the Great Lakes

This document (attached) will help your students explore bathymetric maps of the Great Lakes! There are a few instructions on how to get things set up for the students to explore (it's easy, I promise!) but after that the students can explore the Great Lakes. Also check out the Great Lakes Tour via Google Earth!

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.

Bedrock and Geologic Past Maps

These maps are great resources and go with the Geology Unit Lesson Plan curriculum

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.

Connecting the Dots: Using Data to Create a Bigger Picture

Students will use different weather related data sets from the South Shore region in order to answer questions about the relationship between Lake Superior and the land and people surrounding it. The data sets are from the July 2016 Flood Event on the South Shore.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.

Flooded! Using data to understand a changing Lake Superior

Did you wake up in July of 2016 during a thunderstorm and the next morning see images of flooded Wisconsin rivers in the news? Floods like these could have a big impact on the Lake Superior of the future. Take a look at play-by-play data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Park Service and US Geological Survey to help you and your students make sense of big picture impacts to our watershed and our communities.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.

Formation of Lake Superior

Students will put on a play to go through the steps of how Lake Superior formed by rifting of the Minnesota shore from the Wisconsin shore, erosion of mountains that were created from the rifting, and filling of the rift zone. Optional: discuss how the formations of Lake Superior also resulted in the formation of the different types of igneous (volcanic, from rifting and volcanic activity) and sedimentary (from sedimentation, or build up, of sediments from eroded mountains and other rocks) rocks we find in Lake Superior.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.

Free Maritime Museum Programs-Field Trips

Attached is a flyer with programs offered by the Maritime Museum.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.
8. The Great Lakes are socially, economically, and environmentally significant to the region, the nation and the planet.

Geology Map and The Brownstone Times

The map is a great resource for students and "The Brownstone Times" gives a brief history on the brownstone quarries in Wisconsin.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.
8. The Great Lakes are socially, economically, and environmentally significant to the region, the nation and the planet.

Geology Unit Lesson Plan

This is a guide for a unit plan to teach students about rocks as a timeline, identifying rocks, using maps of Wisconsin's geology, and brownstone in Wisconsin. There are four other pieces to this: a bedrock map, a geologic past map, Geology map (for students to draw on), and "The Brownstone Times". This is added as other curriculum.

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Details

Subject Areas: ,
Grade Levels:
Topics:

Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
8. The Great Lakes are socially, economically, and environmentally significant to the region, the nation and the planet.

Google Earth Tour of St. Louis River and Faxon Creek

Attached are two Google Earth tours that go along with the No Two Are Alike slideshow and lesson plan.

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Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: , ,
Topics:

Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.