Curriculum Filter Results

1824 Map of the St. Louis River Estuary

This is a copy of the first map ever drawn of the St. Louis River Estuary. It was drawn by Admiral Henry Bayfield in 1824. Pay close attention to the inscription on the map.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.


Published by rfeldbrugge | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Mapping Your Place

Students will construct a large map of a place of their choosing. This place will be divided into smaller sections using a string/flag grid system. Each student will take their time to create a map of one portion of the grid to be put together into a larger whole.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.


Published by rfeldbrugge | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Phenology Fun

Students will participate in a hike around their local nature space/place and make observations about what is happening in that natural place. They will try to answer questions like, ‘What is new?’ ‘What is different?’ ‘What has changed?’

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.


Published by rfeldbrugge | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Snow Investigations

Students will observe and investigate the properties of snow and snowflakes as a means to learning about states of matter.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :


Published by rfeldbrugge | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Thermo-What??

Students will learn about temperature and temperature changes using the Lake Superior thermocline. Concepts and vocabulary covered are: water column, thermocline, metalimnion, epilimnion, hypolimnion, lake turnover, dimictic, and lake stratification.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :


Published by rfeldbrugge | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

What Happens to Rain After it Falls?

Students will begin to understand the water cycle by exploring one stage of it, runoff/infiltration.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.


Published by rfeldbrugge | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Flooded! Using data to understand a changing Lake Superior

Did you wake up in July of 2016 during a thunderstorm and the next morning see images of flooded Wisconsin rivers in the news? Floods like these could have a big impact on the Lake Superior of the future. Take a look at play-by-play data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Park Service and US Geological Survey to help you and your students make sense of big picture impacts to our watershed and our communities.

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Subject Areas: ,
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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.


Published by Deanna Erickson | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Lake Superior Geology Informational Text: Read and Understand!

The emphasis on reading and understanding informational texts in classrooms mirrors our efforts in science at the Lake Superior NERR. These readings are based on real scientific efforts in the Lake Superior Watershed, and include questions to check for understanding. This text on geology includes a timeline of the formation of Lake Superior.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.


Published by Deanna Erickson | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Connecting the Dots: Using Data to Create a Bigger Picture

Students will use different weather related data sets from the South Shore region in order to answer questions about the relationship between Lake Superior and the land and people surrounding it. The data sets are from the July 2016 Flood Event on the South Shore.

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Subject Areas: , ,
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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.


Published by rfeldbrugge | No comments | View curriculum with discussion