Curriculum Filter Results

Plants and their Seeds

In this lesson, students do a field study on the great variety of seeds on their school grounds. They use the "wool sock" collection method, hand lenses, and microscopes. The main line of inquiry is "How are seeds dispersed?", but opportunities abound for lesson extension.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.

Question of the Day for Early Childhood -Winter

Continue the classroom discussions about Phenology and the Lake Superior Watershed with these questions relating to Winter

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.

Question of the Day for Early Childhood Classes – Fall

Use these questions relating to Phenology and the Lake Superior Watershed to get young learners to think about their "Neighborhood".

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.

Question of the day for Early Childhood-Spring

Spring has arrived! Here are some questions to get the discussion going about what is happening right outside the classroom!

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.

Where does that data go? Game (and outline)

Sometimes students struggle with understanding where data should go on a table. The attached cards have a date or a date and a measurement. Students should learn that the units are important because it shows us what measurement it is and that we can't just put the data anywhere. If we take data on a Friday, it shouldn't go on Wednesday's row. This game helps students learn about recording data and the importance of units.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :