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Making a Watershed!

This lesson outline and PowerPoint guide you and your students through learning about watersheds by making your own! Students will make their own landscape and hypothesize where water and land are on their landscape. They can add places of human activity and predict what will happen to their watershed when it "rains"! This is a fun, short activity that can be extended to emphasize key ideas. The Enviroscape from the Great Lakes Aquarium is optional but very useful for this lesson!

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.


Published by Ariel Johnson | 0ne comment | View curriculum with discussion

Google Earth Tour of the Nemadji River

Attached is a Google Earth tour of the Nemadji River

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.


Published by Ariel Johnson | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Visual Aid: Images of Animals in Hibernation

Take this one-page quality visual aid out with you on your late fall or winter hike. Students will love to look for burrows, dens, scratchings, tracks and traces of animals when outside. Have students make burrows or dens using snow, branches, leaves, or bring a tarp - then they will be able to become animals, imagining a shelter in the woods.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.


Published by jamiezak | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Web Directory: Lake Superior Watershed Research Project

An incomplete list of sources for student research projects.

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Subject Areas: , ,
Grade Levels: ,
Topics: , , , , , ,

Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.
8. The Great Lakes are socially, economically, and environmentally significant to the region, the nation and the planet.


Published by jamiezak | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Visual Aid: Trees that Keep their Leaves

This is a one-pager, student sheet with quality images of cedar, balsam fir, red pine, spruce, and white pine needles for field identification and extension activities. Have students make a display by gathering specimens, researching, or for smaller students, simply writing the names of the trees by the correct images. Regardless, GO OUTSIDE with your students and collect some samples of these trees for your classroom. Tell the Ojibwe oral story that explains this phenomenon.

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Subject Areas: ,
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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.


Published by jamiezak | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Aquatic Vertebrates: Who am I? Game

There are 5 critters from the Lake Superior watershed just waiting to meet you! A series of characteristics are read aloud, while guesses are taken, then the aquatic vertebrate is revealed.

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Subject Areas: ,
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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.


Published by jamiezak | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Plants and their Seeds

In this lesson, students do a field study on the great variety of seeds on their school grounds. They use the "wool sock" collection method, hand lenses, and microscopes. The main line of inquiry is "How are seeds dispersed?", but opportunities abound for lesson extension.

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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.


Published by jamiezak | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Great Lakes Aquarium – Research Prompts

The attachments below are a "student copy" and a "teacher copy" of a guide to each exhibit at the Great Lakes Aquarium in Duluth, MN. One purpose of this resource is as a school research project kick-off for students and their teacher. Another is developing a teaching unit, using student inquiry as your guide. This resource may also be used for digging in deeper to the exhibits through teacher-guided discussion, partner-group discussion, or individual reflection.

Details

Subject Areas: , ,
Grade Levels: , ,
Topics: , , , , , , ,

Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
1. The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to the world ocean.
2. Natural forces formed the Great Lakes; the lakes continue to shape the features of their watershed.
3. The Great Lakes influence local and regional weather and climate.
4. Water makes Earth habitable; fresh water sustains life on land. :
5. The Great Lakes support a broad diversity of life and ecosystems.
6. The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected.
7. Much remains to be learned about the Great Lakes.
8. The Great Lakes are socially, economically, and environmentally significant to the region, the nation and the planet.


Published by jamiezak | No comments | View curriculum with discussion

Writing in Science

This lesson will help inform students about abstracts, backgrounds, methods, and conclusions that are written for informational papers and posters in order to present research conducted. Students will practice writing their own components after learning what is required for each component. This will help them in understanding how science is presented as well as practice writing skills they can use in the future.

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Subject Areas: ,
Grade Levels: ,
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Great Lakes Literacy Principles:
8. The Great Lakes are socially, economically, and environmentally significant to the region, the nation and the planet.


Published by Ariel Johnson | No comments | View curriculum with discussion